Print Remains A Valued Resource

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Print On Paper Remains A Valued Resource

According to Two Sides North America President Kathi Rowzie, print and digital communications are often compared as an either/or proposition to suggest one is better than the other, but the non-profit organisation’s research shows that both play an important part in today’s information-driven economy.

‘Rather than adopt a one-size-fits all digital communications strategy, savvy news organisations and other businesses will continue to offer consumers a choice and in doing so, help to assure that those who are unwilling or unable to access digital information are not disadvantaged.’

Print media has seen significant disruption during the Coronavirus pandemic, with lockdowns changing the way we access and consume news and information. But even as familiarity with and use of online media has increased, print on paper remains a widely used and highly valued resource. This according to a new survey, ‘Paper’s Place in a Post-Pandemic World,’ commissioned by Two Sides North America and conducted by global research firm Toluna.

As a result of pandemic-related lockdowns, traditional news brands have successfully developed or enhanced their digital platforms, leading many to turn to online media as a primary source of news and information. But it cannot be assumed that everyone who moved online for news did so by choice or that all who moved online will remain there as restrictions on work, travel and leisure are lifted.

While the Two Sides survey showed that 58% of consumers intend to read more news online in the future, this percentage has not changed since 2019. And although print newspaper readership has taken a hit during the pandemic, 49% of consumers say they would be concerned if printed news were to disappear.

In addition, digital communication is not universally welcomed. Nearly three in 10 consumers (29%) prefer to read newspapers in print, and that number jumps to more than four in 10 for those over age 55. 44% of consumers say they gain a better understanding of a story when reading news in print versus online. When it comes to magazines, 38% of consumers prefer to read in print, with percentages climbing to 49% for those over 55 and 63% for those over 65. When all age groups are included, 44% prefer to read books in print.

As might be expected, the survey shows that younger adults, those aged 18 to 24 in particular, prefer to read all types of media online. But even among these younger consumers, 28% prefer to receive and read personal information from doctors and hospitals in print, 27% prefer to read books in print and 23% prefer to receive bills and statements from service providers in print.

‘It’s clear that digital communication is changing the way we receive news and information,’ Rowzie said, ‘but Americans’ growing dependence on digital communication brings its own concerns, which in turn presents opportunities for print media to hold and potentially reclaim a bigger slice of the consumer media pie. Our survey reveals that 52% of consumers believe they spend too much time on their electronic devices, and just over half are concerned that the overuse of digital devices may be damaging their health. As headlines about online security breaches become a common occurrence, 64% say they are increasingly concerned that their personal information held electronically is at risk of being hacked, stolen, lost or damaged.’

Consumers also are increasingly concerned about the environmental impacts of their communication choices, but there are a lot of misconceptions in the marketplace about the sustainability of both digital communication and print on paper. ‘Our survey shows that 67% of consumers believe electronic communication is better for the environment than print on paper,’ Rowzie said. ‘But the miniaturisation of today’s electronic devices and the ‘invisible’ nature of digital infrastructure and cloud-based services cause many to vastly underestimate the environmental footprint of electronic communication. This includes the mining of raw materials like iron, copper and rare earth minerals to produce electronic devices, the massive amounts of predominately fossil fuel energy used to manufacture and operate those devices and the server farms that support them, as well as the enormous and growing amount of e-waste generated.

‘Like all manufactured products, paper has an environmental footprint, too,’ Rowzie explained. ‘But in the U.S., it is a material whose industry grows and regrows its own raw material (wood fibre from trees), derives two-thirds of the power to drive its processes from renewable, carbon-neutral biofuel, cleans and returns more than 90% of the water it uses to the environment and recycles more than 95% of the chemicals it uses to turn trees into pulp. In addition, with a 66% recovery rate, paper is the most recycled material in U.S., according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. That’s a powerful sustainability story the electronics industry cannot match.’

TWO SIDES SOUTH AFRICA
info@za.twosides.info
https://za.twosides.info

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